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Morning Joe

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

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03:01:01

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TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 42, Washington 25, Snowden 23, Russia 23, Kentucky 22, Mitch Mcconnell 15, Cleveland 15, Sam Stein 14, Moscow 12, U.s. 11, Baryshnikov 9, Atlanta 9, Boston 9, Syria 8, America 8, Michael Hayden 7, David Gregory 7, Harold 7, Charles Krauthammer 6, Mcconnell 6,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers  
   and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.  

    August 2, 2013
    3:00 - 6:01am PDT  

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>> rick says mom barging in on your latest conquest asking what thbreakfast. taar john says, that's thing. try living with a very bengal. >> who lives with a bengal hom? >> i do. >> your mom has tweeted us, she stole your sister's phone. >> she did. >> what did she say? >> they go to work but they spend your money. >> moms, look out there, look at what natalie is on. she's shopping. she has your credit card. mike g., put your hand out on camera because you live at home. he says he's saving for a house. right? >> yes. >> that was your excuse. >> yeah. >> saving for a house. all right. everybody, "morning joe" starts right now, for a friday. ♪ >> russia has stabbed us in the back and each day that snowden is allowed to roam f is
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to relish pokingthe knife. us in the eye. as long as prime minister putin acts like a bully, we have only one choice, to stand up to him and show him that bullies pay a price. >> all right. a poke in the -- i don't know. a different gesture that comes to mind when i think of what vladimir putin and the russians have done here. good morning, everyone. it's friday, and the week is going out with a bang. >> i'm confused. >> august 2nd. >> i can't believe it's august. i have not read my -- what is this about? >> that's "the new york post" implying that eliot spitzer is having an extramarital affair. >> oh. >> and what's the inside story there? >> here's the inside story. >> stop it. >> is that -- is that eliot's
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girlfriend? >> i'm asking if you read this? >> i h eliot spitzer was asked by a reporter yesterday if he was having a -- >> it's a commuter. they do these headlines and they make i loo like that's who he's having an affair with. you go underneath and it says eliot spitzer greets a commuter. how would you like to be this commuter going to work this morning? >> how would you like to be eliot spitzer. >> going to be in the headline on a lame duck on affair rumor. >> it's "the new york post," what do they know about headlines. >> with us on set -- a lot -- visiting professor at nyu, former democratic congressman harold ford jr. msnbc contributor mike barnicle as you can see, he's here. thomas roberts is here. >> hi. >> look, it's a sad story on the front. >> i do. that's a good looking jacket, joe. a good looking outfit. >> my paisley smoking jacket is
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at the cleaners. >> look at this. the feds, the ascot, i left it in nantucket. there are a couple little kids up there, the nantucket relief. they're asscotts, they were frayed. >> a lot of news. >> a kid with a frayed ascot to go with the frayed jeans. >> it's sad. >> another guest. >> are they out? is he out? >> he will be out by sunday? >> for good? >> yes. because there was only 50 games left in the season after sunday. >> well maybe next time i invite him up to the nantucket orphans relief ball he'll go up. >> white house correspondent for "the huffington post" sam stein is with us. >> you'll be talking in 45 minutes when you make up another story about the snirs good morning, sir. >> how have you been? >> i'm good. >> good to see you, man. >> good to see you too. >> you can't leave sam hanging like that. say something back. that was not nice of me. >> that's okay.
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>> oh. he got beat up -- >> no. he did not get beat up in school. he went to dartmouth and i heard he beat up more people. >> dartmouth, really? >> yeah. >> one of those elite -- >> the white house is stepping in once again when it comes to delayy obama care is being the employe mandate and now the president has personally intervened to allow the government to continue helping members of congress and their staff when it comes to paying their premiums. members of congress were furious they would soon be forced to pay thousands of dollars -- >> hold on. members of congress, harold, were furious that they were going to be held to this same law that they passed, right? >> odd. >> it is odd. >> they got so angry. >> a lot of odd things. >> the president goes up to see the democrats this week. what is the first thing they're yelling at him about? >> what about my premiums? >> you mean we're going to have
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to live by the laws that we passed on the american people? >> we're going to have to worry about the same things our constituents are forced to worry about, please? >> they take their vacations -- >> five weeks. >> usually when things are just like happening they leave. they would soon be forced to pay thousands of dollars in additional costs through obama care's insurance marketplace. some warned that lawmakers would leave washington and their staffers would look for work outside of government service. >> the horror. >> hold on a second. >> so old on. so harold, when small business owners are telling the obama administration you know, if you do this we're going to lose some of our best employees and the administration says oh, no, no. you all are so crazy. what? what are you talking about? it's happening on capitol hill. they said we're going to lose our best staffers if obama care is implemented up here. >> you would have thought they would have come up with a different set of answers or
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excuses of why -- >> it's awful. >> the three scariest words on capitol hill among the staff and among the elected officials are, the private sector. >> yeah. >> forced to go look in the private sector. oh. >> now the administration is set to announce a plan that lets the federal government continue paying its share of congressional health plans. in turn, those employees would be ineligible for any tax credits or subsidies. >> one of the first things we passed, you remember chris shays, great guy, great congressman, love chris, we passed what was called the shays act, it was radical, first day up there, and it made congress live by the same rules that the rest of the country lived by. >> that's terrible. >> that didn't last long. so now, seriously, how embarrassing that they passed this law. again, small business owners -- >> this is one of those things
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you know you and i understand are going to hear next summer and next fall as the campaigns get going. >> this is theonof the things e explain, easy to convey and hard to dispute. there may be caveats to this, i don't know what they are, but this is an easy one. >> the 30-second ad you would not like and i would not like, congressman scarborough voted for obama care to raise your health premiums and yet he had the president exempt him from obama care. let's exempt congressman scarborough from congress. like that. this is set up so easily for these democrats who have been -- these democrats who passed this. >> please do that again. >> play some music and let joe do that again. >> it's just awful. >> it's so embarrassing. >> you might have a tease about just such a spot being put together this weekend. >> oh. >> really?
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>> yes. >> kentucky. >> look at you, prophetic. >> yeah. >> all right. moving on to other news, this weekend we're going to get our first real look at how the u.s. senate race in kentucky is shaping up. >> there you go. >> both senator mitch mcconnell and his democratic aponent alison lundergan grimes will speak at a picnic in western kentucky. more than 10,000 people are expected to attend the event which unofficially kicks off at the state's political season. if the public polling is to be believed, the race is already in a dead heat. according to a new ppp poll, lundergan grimes has a one-point lead over mcconnell and an internal poll conducted on behalf of lundergan grimes' campaign found the democrat with a two-point lead. since announcing her candidacy, lundergan grimes has come out swinging which may be a reason why the race is already so close. she has warned mcconnell she is not going to be bullied calling the minority leader the, quote,
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guardian of gridlock and already aggressively campaigning in kentucky's coal country and making a hard push to win over female voters questioning mcconnell's record on women's rights. lundergan grimes is distancing herself from president obama who lost 116 out of kentucky's 120 counties -- >> is that bad? >> it's not good. she will be the first female senator elected to the u.s. senate from kentucky. >> you know, sam stein, if so somebody your age, like 16, 17 years old, a teen. >> would not remember when kentucky is a swing state. >> it is a swing state at heart. barack obama lost badly there this time than four years ago. don't remember that bill clinton won there and kentucky elects democrats often. this is a tough race for mitch mcconnell. >> i agree with that. mitch mcconnell has built this political infrastructure in the state quietly bringing back money, naming buildings after himself, being there for the
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basic institutions of the state, the basic universities, sports teams, et cetera. you're right, people presume kentucky is deep red because obama got trounced there and i doubt obama will be campaigning a alison grimes' behalf. democrat to win statewide. it happened with bill clinton. there are pockets of democratic support in there. elliott county in kentucky is the longest continuously voting democratic county in america. there is a possibility there and i think these polls show there's room for her to improve because she's not necessarily the most recognized figure in the state. only been in politics a few years now. mitch mcconnell has a tough race on his hands. >> i know mitch mcconnell's people know it's going to be a tough race. >> the fancy farms picnic this weekend is a tradition. thousands of people show up. there have been some kentucky throwdowns in the past between politicians so in this instance,
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i think what people are speculating is you just go in and try to do no harm. show up, have a good time, you know, and not get too political. but the governor -- it's a democratic governor. >> yeah. mitch mcconnell as the at but d.c. insider that he is ve an es already leading in the polls this way. if you get ashley judd coming out for her it's just a done deal. >> ashley calling from her tennessee mansion. that would be stop. >> tennesseans for kentuckians for anybody but mitch. all right. what else do we have? >> snowden. >> what about that? that vladimir. >> lot of different -- we have michael hayden on today. great timing to ask him about this. it's been a while since we've seen edward snowden. now we have a flu picture of him. >> oh, good. >> this time, it's stamped
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inside official government papers making him a legal resident of russia. >> thank god he got his freedom. >> wow. >> it's hard to believe -- >> wait. wasn't there a movie like gregory hines whatever? >> did what? >> separate lives? he wanted to go to protester in russia f ends up -- s? >> i don't know. >> wasn't he a dancer? >> yeah. >> what was it? >> separate lives. >> will you look it up. >> can i do the story. >> ber rish na cough was in the movie. >> i said "white knights". >> called "white nights." the song was separate lives. >> laura braneny began. >> oh, my god. >> i don't think so. i know ber rish na cough was in the movie. >> what did she sing? >> i don't know. >> i can assure you're the only one talking about -- taking the story -- >> sam, you weren't even born.
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>> this is the oldest sounding conversation on "morning joe" ever. oh, my god. >> ber rish na cough. >> do you know who baryshnikov is. >> what is that movie? >> ba rish na kov with kerry bradshaw in "sex in the city" kerry left big and it was a mess and went back with big. >> should have stayed with baryshnikov. >> sam if you would be quiet, young whipper snapper i will eat met sa musial with my oatmeal. examined. >> the former contractor has been granted -- >> what? >> you need like a lazy boy. >> believe me, i'm ordering one. phil griffin will do his job i will be in the lazy boy by the end of next week. >> stay with me here. >> yeah. >> the former nsa contractor has been granted temporary asylum by moscow that will allow him to remain in the country for at
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least a year. yesterday snowden was seen leaving the moscow airport where he was stranded more than a month. it goes without saying that russia's decision complicates relations with the u.s. >> yeah. >> do we have jim maceda? nbc's jim maceda live in moscow who will raise the bar on this conversation here. >> ask him if he saw "white knight" if he thought baryshnikov did a better job there or "sex in the city". >> what's the latest on snowden? >> i can't remember what i was going to say. you make me laugh. >> oh, good. >> you need something uplifting here and you really bring it. >> terrific. >> listen, mika, there's no question that snowden's release has further strained very difficult relations to begin with. we heard jay carney yesterday say the united states was extremely disappointed, that they are reevaluating the utility i think was the word in diplomat speak of an upcoming
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summit that's been planned here between the two individuals, but the question is just how far the obama administration is willing to hit back and embarrass president vladimir putin. boycotting a major event like the g-20 that is coming up in st. petersburg at the beginning of september, that apparently according to analysts here, seems unlikely. that's probably a step too far. but again, that planned summit where they're supposed to talk about a whole range of issues, syria, iran, nukes, even a new nuclear arms treaty between the two countries, one-on-one, that seems likely now to be canceled out of protest. the american fugitive, not baryshnikov but snowden, spent his first night in freedom as an official refugee here in russia. his lawyer said that he's staying in the home of an american ex-pat family, presumably somewhere in moscow, though we're not sure, and he
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looks forward, according to the lawyer, to learning russian, getting a job and supporting himself. you'll enjoy this. he's not interested in any kind of i.t. job. he apparently wants to work as a human rights activist. back to you guys. >> nbc's jim maceda, thank you. >> thank you, jim. we're going to send you a dvd of the movie. >> no. >> "white knights expatriate russian dancers on the plane forced to land in soviet territory, 1985." he's taken to an apartment in which a black american who has married a russian woman lives with her. he is to become a dancer again, but he wishes to escape but can he trust the american? >> the american was gregory hines i assume? >> gregory hines, extraordinary dancer and actor. >> "say you say me" sung by lionel richie. i remember we got a free weekend of hbo, the neighbors got it but
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gave it to us -- >> how does that work? >> cable that he drilled through the wall. >> i wasn't that sophisticated. but if the neighbor got it maybe you could get it too. >> a story in terms of our relationship with russia -- >> i know whether that song separate lives was in it too. phil collins, "separate lives" also with marilyn martin. another song in there. >> i got to tell you -- >> ♪ say you say me >> it really has. >> what else is going on today? >> we're going to talk to the moderator of "meet the press," david gregory and "the washington post's" eugene robinson, former director of the cia if he still will show up this morning, chances are he might because we're friends with him, but my god. >> i'm working on it. >> ♪ say you say me >> joins us on the set. this will be fascinating. later the president and ceo of the cleveland clinic, dr. tobey cosgrove. plus, where the american dream is moving?
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"fortune" magazine's leigh is really good.e with her new up next, look who's here. >> mike, do you know the of cou. >> sam stein's got it.uilds too. >> it really top stories in the politico playbook. first, ♪ from behind the walls of doubt ♪ >> i think bill is too young to know this movie. >> bill karins. >> let it play out. >> it picks up right here. >> hey, bill, can we just see the map moving and you not say nothing? >> i have no idea what channel i'm on this morning. good morning, everyone. thunderstorms continue to roll through the central plains. heading out this morning in kansas city or wichita that's where the worst of the weather continues to be. as far as the airports are going to go during the day, anyone doing traveling these are my airport weather concerns. kansas city this morning, st. louis this afternoon. you could deal with thunderstorms and travel delays if you're traveling from chicago, indianapolis,
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cleveland, pittsburgh, or boston this morning, minor delays. you'll be passing thunderstorms, maybe an hour or two at most. boston by the way the rain is moving out this morning and weather will be improving as we go throughout your day. not a bad afternoon. great summer day, finally returning to the beach after yesterday's misery in new england down through the mid-atlantic. the weekend weather looks hot in texas. still really cool in the great lakes. not a good weekend for any beach plans. look at dallas today, 104. as we go throughout your saturday and sunday, notice a few storms in the mid-atlantic through kansas city by saturday but should clear out for a nice end to the weekend. just the southeast a few storms. wash out your summer weekend plans. speaking of summer we're going to warm it up quickly over washington, d.c. should be 100 times better than yesterday. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. ♪ say you say me ♪ say it together
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all right. 22 past the hour. time to take a look at morning papers. "the new york times," the state department is shutting down dozens of u.s. embassies and consulates located in the middle east and asia. u.s. officials say their concerns come from an al qaeda threat to u.s. posts worldwide on or around sunday, august 4th. currently the emergency warning only impacts locations that are open on sunday. however, the shutdown could be extended smooth "wall street journal" a pew poll shows that one in three 20-somethings like sam stein -- >> never going to leave. >> live with their parents. that's about 12% more than 2009. despite an improving job market and mika, i have to tell you, the steins are so happy that they decided to build that garage apartment. >> i know. >> for grandma. >> i know. >> who ended up not wanting to live there but that's where sam is. >> he comes down every morning
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for his yum-yums. >> they would love that. that's not true. >> all right. from -- >> don't even know what that means. >> from our parade of papers, "washington post's" italy's high court upholding former prime minister silvio berlusconi's prison term for tax fraud. >> this is a disgrace. >> the court is reviewing whether he will be barred from public office for five years. >> what? >> italy's public parties are on the verge of collapse as politicians reevaluate their allegiances in light of the decision. >> that's an absolute disgrace. >> the "san francisco chronicle," bay area rapid employees are given 72 hours of a plant shutdown of what could be a second strike in a month. announcement comes as they failed to reach a deal regarding, pay, pensions, and health care. >> "usa today" the third episode of the season of "glee" will deal directly with the death of star cory monteith. fox executives did not explicitly say how they would
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handle his character's exit. he was found dead in a hotel room in canada in july. only 31 years old. >> the shatting into ga free times fired its editor for changing a headline on an editorial before printing. the headline which said take your job's plan and shove it mr. president, ran on tuesday. when president obama was in chattanooga. the paper said this was not approved as a title and johnson was terminated for violating the editing process. the paper maintains the decision had nothing to do with the content of his piece and the headline before was great job, mr. president, we think the job plans may be your best approach in half a dozen years we're excited about it. >> i don't believe that story. the hdl wanted to make it more concise. >> harold ford jr., see who is number one. pick up the "usa today," that's a story. >> add in full swing this morning. all right -- >> it's in color.
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>> mike is taking a self-y of himself. >> sunday's parade -- >> i'm not good at math, but i only have to count to number one. >> interview with oprah. >> never gets old. >> forest whitaker discussing "the butler" a film by lee daniels. with us now mike allen the chief white house correspondent for politico, mike allen. here with the morning playbook. mike? >> and in person. happy friday. >> hey! >> wow! it's cool. yeah. >> that is better in person. >> is it? lindsey graham will get serious primary opposition and first woman to graduate from the city dal, mike, tell us? >> nancy mason is an amazing south carolina story. her father was the most decorated living citadel graduate. it's such a big institution. >> incredible. >> he was the commandant of cadets, number three leader when she was there and she's going to
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announce saturday with a message of washington being out of control and around this table, the very things that get lindsey graham a lot of praise, get him trouble with the tea party back home. they call him liberal lindsey among some -- >> so conservatives have been wondering now about six, seven years why lindsey never gets opposition. >> now he has a couple of them. >> from the conservative wing of the party. i think last time he escaped a challenge. but i mean, he's got a lot more to worry about from the republican side of the aisle than from any democratic challenge, right? >> he sure does. he's part of the gang of 8 on immigration. he's a dealmaker. someone up in washington who wants to get things done which gets you trouble back at home. so she'll be the second challenger actually. there's a businessman richard cash, what great name for a politician. >> a businessman. >> i'm richard cash. >> richard cash. >> i like that. >> yes. >> i got that.
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>> so both of them are -- for months we've seen that lindsey graham is preparing for this. it's one of the reasons he was -- made himself the chief prosecutor on benghazi, pushing that. he's tried to push other issues as mitch mcconnell has done as we saw at the top of the show, to try to get some love with conservatives. but she's going to come out with a message saying that he's old, he's out of touch. >> and -- >> she's 35, he's 58. >> she's going to be supported by the tea party most likely? >> yeah. and she has a great relationship with the sort of conservative blog culture. she's a businessman of her own. a mother. and so going to -- go out there saying -- >> this is her first political run? >> it is. she not only was the first woman to graduate from the citadel, she did it in three years with honors. >> wow. >> relationship with nikki haley? >> that's incredible. >> if she doesn't, she will. >> chris christie is now being hosted by one of the biggest
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check writers the republicans have. tell us about it. >> so out west, governor christie was yesterday at sheldon adelson one of his casinos. he was the one that bank rolled basically the newt gingrich campaign in 2012. so shelden adelson is the most sought-after checkbook in america. he can buy himself, propel a candida candidacy. we're told not to read too much of this. he wasn't there. he was in asia. his name on the invitation for the $3800 a person fund-raiser. showed the two do have an affinity. chris christie is -- does a line with him on at lot of issues. this is a preview, shows how the governor with his re-election race is able to get a headstart. >> what do you think about the kentucky race, mitch mcconnell -- >> i'm not sure about that. >> the one-point poll came as a surprise. people thought that he was more
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comfortably ahead. republicans still think he's going to be okay but he's taking it seriously. his chief of staff just quit and is going to work for the senate republican campaign committee. >> right. >> they're going to focus it. they're running this like a presidential race, not only in how they're raising money but in the technology they're using. the senate republican leader. not going to take any chances. >> harold -- >> what does it mean when you're under 50? >> i mean it always seems to be trouble but more and more candidates are getting under 50 these days. >> i think it's interesting you find women running against these republicans. in kentucky it's a democrat, in south carolina it's an internal race. is this a sign of things to come for republican senators across the country with all that's going on in the senate and the house with how women's rights and women's issues are being handled or mishandled. >> today would you call him the favorite? >> i would call him the favorite today but i don't know much about the candidate in kentucky. she's attractive, seems smart,
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and understands at least from reports she has to distance herself from all of washington which could become a theme looks at running and taking on mcconnell. >> someone with deep family roots in the state you can't [ inaudible ]. >> always helps. thank you so much. >> happy weekend. >> happy friday. happy weekend. >> an incredible comeback in boston. down five runs in the ninth inning but did they get the win last night versus seattle? sports is next. [ dad ] so i walked into that dealer's office and you know what i walked out with? [ slurps ] [ dad ] a new passat. [ dad ] 0% apr. 60 months. done and done. [ dad ] in that driveway, is a german-engineered piece of awesome. that i got for 0% apr. good one, dad. thank you, dalton.
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time pore sports. this is huge. huge. it's starting to look like alex rodriguez may not cave to major league. talks have stalled with a-rod resisting the length of the suspension and the fact it may cost him a portion of the $100 million still left on his contract. a-rod came to the negotiating table after mlb said it was considering a lifetime ban. rodriguez has maintained he has no connection to the biogenesis clinic. he is scheduled to return to the field for a rehab game. this game with the trenton
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thunder. >> the red sox coming off a 15-inning walk-off win on wednesday but last night. >> oh, no. >> down by five runs going into the ninth against the mariners, possible not in boston. sox would load the bases for shane victorino who punches it through the second base side. two runs score. johnny gomes would tie with a base hit up the middle and with the bases loaded still one out, daniel nava had a chance to win it all. sn>> nava hits it in the air to centerfield. deep and far and that ball is going to land in the red sox have an amazing come-from-behind victory on what turns out to be a magical night for fenway. >> tell you what he was doing. >> larry lucchino. >> sat in the same seat, in the same position until that team won because that's -- you don't move when they start winning. it's bad luck. >> probably pacing back and forth. >> i think he probably was still
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as a rock. yep. >> victorino has been a heck of an addition. >> and a terrific guy. >> wow. that must have been an amazing game. >> other good news. the red sox now have a major league leading 11 walk-off wins. wasn't the only good news for boston. pitcher aceves welcomed a new baby into the world yesterday, the new name, apollo i. >> same as my oldest son. >> inspired by rocky. >> i'm excited for the red sox. this is cool. dodgers/clubs. l.a. continuing to be one of the hottest teams in baseball behind rookie yasiel puig. homered again last night. dodgers have won eight of their last ten. blue jays -- they're having a tough year. they were picked by many to win the al east but this isn't going to help. melky cabrera tracks down the base hit to left, slap stick fashion, loses the ball on the throw. oh. like me.
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blue jays lose to the angels, 8-2. here we have it, the "usa today" releasing the first preseason college football coach's poll, topping the list, alabama followed by ohio state. the oregon ducks, stanford and georgia. alabama 58 of 62 possible first place votes. the s.e.c. had the most teams in the top 25 with six of those. >> all right. still ahead -- >> roll tide. >> nbc's david gregory gives us a preview -- thank you, thomas -- of "meet the press." eugene robinson with his column on senator ted cruz and the threat of a government shutdown. up next the other must-read opinion pages. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks.
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he is being accused of sexual harassment by eight different women as well as anyone looking at this picture right now. now, the details, the details are a little disturbing, so if you have children in the room, they're about to grow up real quick. jim. >> kissing, groping, lewd comments, sexual harassment those are the allegations. >> workers referred to one of his m.o.'s as, quote, the filner headlock. >> puts his arm around the shoulder pulls it in tighter around her neck, pull in close to their face, and tell them, you're wonderful, you're beautiful, i want to kiss you. >> bob filner's former communications director says he asked her to work without wearing underwear. >> okay. okay. . that sounds bad, but we have no reason to think filner wasn't also willing to work without
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underwear. >> oh, my gosh. what is wrong with him? >> so many things. i think the biggest problem is, that san diego did not offer sexual harassment courses before he became mayor. >> there is a manual. >> they never gave him that manual. how was he to know? >> 42 past the hour. >> time for the must-read opinion pages. we'll start with "the washington post," charles krauthammer asks this question, how fractured is the gop echoing exactly the conversation we were having yesterday and the point you were making. he says those who fancy themselves tea party patriots fighting a sold out cocktail swirling establishment are demanding another cliff dive as a show of principle and manline manliness. this is about tactics. if i thought this would work, i would support it. but i don't fancy suicide. it has a tendency to be fatal. as for manliness, the real question here is sanity.
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nothing could better revive the fortunes of a failing, flailing, fading, democratic administration than a government shutdown where the penalty is portrayed as standing up to the gop on honoring our debts and paying our soldiers in the field. how many times must we learn the lesson, you can't govern from one house of congress. you need to win back the senate and then the presidency. shutting down the government is the worst possible way to get there. indeed, it's obama's fondest hope for a democratic recovery. there you gop. it's like -- >> it's what i said yesterday and also was on hugh hewitt's radio show yesterday afternoon and a point i tried to make to hugh, the president is on the ropes on obama care, he had to push back the employer mandate, they're having to do the same thing in congress now, only 34% of americans support obama care, and what i -- you know, what i told hugh was that this is the worst possible time to do a
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cliffdive. as charles krauthammer said, to do a cliff dive, prove your manliness and to work on breeding resentment. it's what krauthammer says, what i said, what actually thinking republicans would say. instead of saying you're a rino because you don't want to shut down the government and give president obama -- no, there are some of us who would actually like to win back the white house before we die. >> right. >> and this gets us further away from that. the sort of resentment that ted cruz plays on, may help him grab headlines, marco rubio may be wanting to shut down the government because he has to get as far away from immigration reform as humanly possible, but az i've been saying here and on the show for years, we've got to worry more about these individuals stirring up resentment so they can raise more money and get more attention, get more headlines and start worrying about the overall brand. how do the exchanges they
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worry about. a lot subsidized by mandatory spending already. i don't understand this notion to lead people down a path, lead republican vote ers also hurts e
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party because you have, you know, people listening to ted cruz going oh, gosh, everybody that doesn't want to follow him down this rabbit trail isn't a real republican and why should i support mitch mcconnell, he's like barack obama. why should i support anybody running for the senate. they're just like ted cruz tells me they're in the surrender caucus. support tom coburn? it's just ridiculous. it's damaging to the republican party. it's damaging to the republican brand. and if you don't want to hear it from me, my fellow republicans, read charles krauthammer this morning. now, for a completely different view, hear from sam stein. i got an e-mail from his mom saying that -- >> yeah. >> she did not make him his special yum-yums this morning, just to have him sit in a cold studio and not be called on. she wants us to bring a blanket and put it over his lap. i'm sorry. do you have any thoughts?
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>> that was the most demeaning in t intro you could possibly have done. >> you called me grandpa. >> it is that kind of morning. >> i mean, what is there to argue with? it's just a silly and poorly thought out tactical maneuver by ted cruz and marco rubio -- >> i'm sorry. >> no. that was brilliant. this is stupid. i'm not sure if they understand how damaging this potentially could be for their brand. two points, one is that in essence, their argument is we're going to defend obama care. if we don't defunds obama care it will cause more pain for the sake of getting rid of obama care. we aren't that far removed from the elections in which obama care wasn't a side issue. it was a major issue for republicans. the vast majority looks at this and said we litigate this, let's
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move on a little bit from this battle. 40 votes to repeal is excessive at this point. >> by the way -- let me -- >> the supreme court declared it constitutional. >> the supreme court declared it constitutional. be clear here, i have no problem shutting down the government if you get something out of it. everybody else does. i have no problem. i had no problem shutting down the government in 1995. i think eventually it led bill clinton to the table. we got a plan, balanced the budget for the if irs time in a generation, first time in fou years in a row. i'm not squeamish about shutting down the government, not for really, really, really stupid things. and this is stupid. because as charles krauthammer says it won't work. >> all right. on monday's show we have the mayor of new orleans, mitch landrieu who will be here in the studio. >> a good man. by the way did you hear about ed quinn edwards, 85, had a baby. >> yeah. >> i'm looking for a comeback. he needs to be louisiana's next governor. >> this guy is unbelievable. >> jimmy mcmillan from "the rent
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is too dam high" running for mayor what he had to say about anthony weiner's candidacy. >> can't wait for that. >> jimmy's campaign ads/music videos. news you can't use, straight ahead. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004. vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve.
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♪ everybody get up ♪ ♪ hey hey hey ♪ hey hey hey ♪ hey hey hey ♪ hey hey hey ♪ ♪ baby i'm going back baby i'm out of my mind ♪ >> oh, my gosh. >> that's pretty good. >> jimmy fallon with robin think doing "blurred lines" which is your summer jam. >> it is. >> you replaced carly rae jepsen "call me maybe". >> that was last year. >> this year a new video. >> "call me maybe". >> nobody wearing clothes. >> blurred lines. the lines have blurred. speaking of which, wait until
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you hear this. >> i can't wait. >> endorsement that may get anthony weiner right back in favorite with certain new yorkers. jimmy mcmilan, aka the rent is too dam high guy who always wears gloves. >> why does he wear the gloves. >> to shake hands, baby. >> okay. throwing his weight behind weiner. mcmillon is running for mayor. he's running for mayor. >> is he really? >> endorsing himself but also endorsing weiner. he's running under the party of the rent is too dam high party. ♪ i say the rant is too dam high ♪ ♪ i'm jimmy mcmilan 2013 i'm running for mayor come and run with me ♪ >> great ad. >> in an interview with the "new york observer" he told weiner not to quit before adding, quote, we are all freaky. he just exposed his freaky-ism in the wrong way. >> well -- >> i mean seriously, he is america's air row stotle.
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>> he spelled it out. >> he hit it on the head. >> that goes up to ask not what you can do for your country. >> we're all freaky. just showed his freaky-ism the wrong way. >> weiner spoke about his on-line sued nim carlos danger in an interview with univision saying it was a joke in my personal life between me and one person. he did not elaborate. >> i don't get it. personal life, is there more? i don't get it. >> we don't want to know. >> there's a lot more but i don't want to know more. he needs to keep his freaky-ism to himself. hey hey hey. >> what? >> blurred lines. >> still ahead, the monthly news jobs report is coming out in about 90 minutes. the analysis from leigh gallagher. up next david gregory here, eugene robinson here at the top of the hour and "morning joe" shall return. ♪ [ acoustic guitar: upbeat ]
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♪ now that we're living ♪ living ♪ separate lives >> 11 rubls. 11 perot wets. >> okay. ♪ ♪ ♪ my love my love >> can you count? >> don't worry into. >> six spins. ♪
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oh. >> why did they choose him for the part? >> yeah. >> mike is doing that now. >> yeah. >> all right. >> during the break -- >> there have been people tweeting they can't get these songs out of their heads now and they're going to be watching this all night. >> welcome back to "morning joe." >> on their beta max. >> you can't get this anywhere else. mike barnicle and harold ford jr. still with us along with sam stein in washington if he's still speaking to us. >> i doubt it. >> and joining us from washington, the moderator of "meet the press.." >> sam would tell you even if he was speaking to us, most of us couldn't hear him without our hearing aids turned up. >> let me do that. >> david gregory and pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the "washington post" and political analyst eugene robinson. >> we've been taking abuse from young sam stein for talking about "separate lives". >> we feel old. >> the movie "white nights"
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baryshnikov and gregory hines. >> yeah. yeah. i remember it. not one of my all-time favorites but i remember it. >> okay. >> are we going to talk about "against all odds" next? >> oh, my god. >> making fun of us? >> let's get all the phil collins' inspired movies together. i would love that. we have a lot -- >> "in the air tonight" use that music coming into the next segment. >> little "miami vice" action. a lot to talk about. in washington this morning, there are a lot of people talking about how congress passes laws and then exempts themselves from the laws. now the president has decided to make sure that congress doesn't have to abide by obama care. portions of obama care. >> a piece that folds into this conversation, the white house is stepping in once again when it comes to the way obama care is being implemented. first a decision to delay the employer mandate and now the president has personally
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intervened to allow the government to continue helping members of congress and their staff members when it comes to paying their premiums. members of congress were furious they would soon be forced to pay thousands of dollars in additional costs through obama care's insurance marketplaces. >> that they voted to set up. >> some even warned that lawmakers would leave washington and their staffers would look for work outside of government service. >> who cannot make this stuff up. >> do you promise? >> david gregory, you can't make this stuff up. congress passes laws, then they exempt themselves from laws. the most important law to be passed in the last three, four years, congress is saying, if you make us live by this law that we passed, everybody -- all of our good workers will leave. that's what small business has been trying to tell the administration for years! >> you know, i mean it's amazing, part of it is the divide over this being such a
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partisan bill that passed and became law that didn't have republican support. you have mitch mcconnell, as you've been talking about, is going to face perhaps a tough primary fight in kentucky, who is writing letters to sports leagues like the nfl saying that this is a bill, that it's not even a law. you have that level -- that lack of acceptance ofs this law and everybody flows from that. how cooperative you are in trying to implement it or the arguments you make, especially as you're about ready to get out of town about why it's not going to work. >> gene, the biggest problem is, it's the democrats complaining bitterly behind closed doors to president obama, save us from obama care. the president goes up to the capitol hill, he talks to the democrats, the first topic they want to talk about, the first topic he talks about, is how he's going to exempt them from obama care. >> well, joe, how many laws does
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congress not exempt itself from? there's a lot of precedent for this. lawmakers don't seem to actually want to live by the laws they pass. but anyhow, we're not going to have to worry about this, right? because the house is going to vote today to repeal obama care, so surely that will just sail through and solve the whole thing, right? >> and they're going to shut down the government if they don't get their way. >> of course. >> i mean charles krauthammer coming out this morning saying what we said yesterday, this is political suicide, and it wouldn't work anyway. sam stein, so let's give a little background on this. >> sure. >> i think it was grassley that put this amendment in to make sure that congress would have to live by the same laws that they passed as far as obama care goes. talk about congress, how long have they been complaining to the president that if they have to live by the terms of obama
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care the best people would leave capitol hill? >> you're right. this happened with chuck grassley during the crafting of the bill. he said -- he did this clever thing that said if we're going to set up these exchanges where congress should have to participate democrats said sure and jumped at it. end up in the situation where we are now. the issue is not that they're trying to exempt themselves from the law, but that the federal government pays a good chunk of the health care premiums from its workers. the exchanges don't have a template available or didn't have a template available for employers to continue paying premiums. basically the exchange set up for individuals and small businesses, not for huge employers like the federal government. so congress was left with this problem. could they continue paying 75% or so of the premiums for the workers and if not, then that meant the staffers and congressmen themselves would have to pay huge premiums, 100%, all of it. they were worried about the brain drain that would happen if you had that kind of cost incurred by staffers. what happened last night,
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essentially the president came in with in consultation with members of congress and said we'll continue having the government pay that chunk of the premiums so you won't have to take on all of the burden. they're basically continuing the status quo but shifting the coverage to these exchanges. >> harold, it is, as you said, a terrible 30 second commercial -- >> the optics are this probably should have been realized earlier on. sam makes a reasonable statement. i don't know if it's altogether accurate. it probably is. >> it is. >> the young -- >> that should have been addressed from the outset. you will have small business leaders continue to raise concern about this, and it's optically -- sam is right, imagine trying to explain that at a town hall meeting. >> terrible. >> before a group of voters. hard one to explain. >> boy, i sure wish the federal government would come in and pay 75% of my health care but unfortunately they won't. >> that's the answer. >> so congressman x gets a free ride from the federal
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government, while they're putting all the costs and the burdens on my small business and i'm going to have a brain drain who -- when is barack obama going to come and get my best workers. >> hill staffers are poorly paid. these are hard-working people who are poorly paid -- >> what's poorly paid? >> think about the amount of hours, these young kids earning from $20,000 to $40,000 a year. so adding that cost -- don't get me wrong -- >> you paid your staffers $20,000 a year. >> i paid my staffers i mean 40 to 80 to 90, the top amount is 100,000. >> i was told going in the top amount was $17,500. boy was i duped. >> 50 people working for you. >> gene, in the "washington post" you write about the party of nutty ideas and you say this, the house gop majority has decided its final act before the summer recess will to be take its 40th vote to repeal all or part of the patient protection
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and affordable care act. amazingly, this pointless exercise in the house makes more sense than what republicans are doing in the senate. there, senator ted cruz of texas, tea party backed allies, are threatening to shut down the whole government, to strip obama care of all funding. cruz contends it is mere cocktail chatter wisdom that the party was damaged by newt gingrich's 1995/ '96 shutdowns. he claims incredibly that the episode was good for the gop. this would all be hilarious if it weren't so alarming. absence strong leadership from mature adults the gop is drifting past party of no territory into an unchartered realm where the object seems to be to make the nation ungovern wereble. voters will have to decide whether elected officials who do not believe in government should perhaps find another line of work. >> well, there you go. i mean, it is the sort of
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approach to government, not to just say no to everything, but pull the house down. let's shut down the government. as you guys have said all morning, this won't work. this is a silly thing to do, a way for ted cruz and marco rubio and rand paul to raise some money and raise their profiles and, you know, i'd love to see them in, you know, sort of a fren mys reality show. that would be kind of fun. >> it would be. david gregory, it's not just gene robinson who is saying this. charles krauthammer, i would say the patron saint of most conservatives, is talking about how this is the most stupid idea and it's stupid because it won't work. charles krauthammer says like i say, if shutting down the government will push forward an important conservative idea, we're all for it.
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this is a bad idea. it won't work. >> there's no indication of what's changed between now and last january when republicans made a decision mot to force it to the brink like this, to try to talk about a government shutdown like this. on obama care, the reality is, that republicans understand once an entitlement like this starts to take root, you can't take that away. they're already seeing that now, saying they don't have the votes. they want to get out ahead of any kind of implementation of it, talking this morning about the president making certain exemptions or delaying the employer mandate is all about trying to insure a smoother transition into the program being implemented at which point, it gets all the more difficult for republicans to ever try to roll it back. but again, i don't see what's changed in their calculus about what a government shutdown helps them now. it's where the tea party wing is.
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>> all right. >> harold -- >> my colleague, michael gerson in his column this morning pointed something out and charles krauthammer drove at the same point and i kind of did too. if republicans really want to get rid of obama care, win the presidency. win the senate and win the presidency. this is a law that was passed and you're simply not going to repeal it or get rid of it without winning a national election. so go out there and do it. this is not the way to do that. this is the way to lose national elections. >> this takes us even further from that goal. >> another major headline we need to get to this morning it's been a while since we've seen edward snowden. now we have a new picture of him. this time, it's stamped inside official government papers making him a legal resident of russia. the former nsa contractor has been granted temporary asylum by moscow that will allow him to remain in the country at least a year. yesterday, snowden was seen
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leaving the moscow airport where he was stranded more than a month. it goes without saying that russia's decision complicates relations with the u.s. president obama is expected to meet with president putin next month to discuss the ongoing civil war in syria, but now those plans are believed to be in doubt. i can't imagine why they wouldn't be at this point. the white house says they are, quote, evaluating the utility of the president's trip to moscow. and i -- yeah. i mean every interaction so far with putin has been -- >> the president a couple days, he won't have to go to moscow from st. petersburg, there for the group 20 meeting, what you indicated is the larger problem, russia's role in what's happening in syria, what's ongoing with iran. i mean, we have to deal with russia at some level to help out the situation in syria and in the middle east. >> david gregory, vladimir putin is not taking anything to do with us seriously. >> no. and as we've talked about on this program before, this goes
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back to the bush administration and the collapse of that relationship and it only gets worse and yet mike is right, there's still a level of having to deal with russia on things they will care about as well. i look at the headline and the picture in "the new york times," imagine if this was when the movie "white nights" came out and talking about the soviet era and cold war. that's not what we're talking about. we do have common interests here, but this becomes kind of a sphere of influence game, too, with russia. i think the administration has to send a strong message this is not a partnership. and russia is not acting like an ally. there are going to be repercussions. the winter games coming up as well. is there going to be leverage used there? so there's a lot of pressure points. but it's going to be communicated i would think rather strongly that snowden is a symbol of the deterioration of this relationship that's got a long way to go now. >> on the other hand, doesn't the united states have to keep its eye on the ball in terms of
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our bigger interests in the relationship with russia, like syria. i mean, it's something you can skip the summit perhaps, but at some point you have to talk to putin about syria it seems to me and there are other big issue going forward and i don't know if you want to elevate snowden to such a level that this one guy is -- stands in the middle of a relationship between, you know, two of the most important countries in the world. >> i think it already happened. >> some calculus about where they've been helpful. you go back to nuclear issues on iran, there was no help whatsoever. those goes back to the previous administration, then on syria, no help whatsoever, no help in the united nations. so at some point where does the administration try something a little different? gene, i take your point about elevating snowden. at some point if they keep ratcheting up his importance the more difficult it will be dealing with them.
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>> harold, this is -- this is one example after another after another where the russians just have not cooperated with us and i think the biggest problem is we've got the -- is it the miss universe pageant coming up in russia as well? >> yeah. >> in october. >> alex -- >> we need -- >> alex, we need a countdown clock to the miss universe pageant in russia and a real question, are we going to do what we did in 1980 with the summer olympic games? >> not send our participants some. >> not send our participants. i know that will upset a lot of people. anyway. >> david -- >> so many things hang in the balance. >> coming up on sunday on "meet the press." >> we were going to go. i was hoping to be a judge. >> we're going to talk about snowden and also the ongoing battle over the nsa and have they really used these surveillance programs to foil terrorist plots in the way they have. there's been debate about that on capitol hill. we'll get into that. as we've mentioned here as well the future of the republican party, joe will be with us on
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our political round table to discuss that. and this crisis in baseball, by the way, we may get news on this today. we're watching that closely. >> all right. david gregory, thanks. we'll be watching. eugene robinson, we'll be looking for your column on-line and in "the washington post." thank you very much. still ahead, he was in charge of boths the cia and the nsa, we'll ask retired general michael hayden about the calls in congress to curb the government's spy program. up next, the nation's changing landscape. leigh gallagher's new book explores why the suburbs are no longer the american dream. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> mika, we have a few trouble spots out there. take you through weekend forecasts also. first thing's first. boston out to cape cod, heavy rain briefly over the top of you. thunderstorm rolling down to the south of boston towards the cape. just be careful driving down there this morning. it will be gone shortly. through the chicago area, you avoided most of the storms. rolling across lake michigan towards south bend and then to
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the south of there, travel trouble spot this morning, heavy rain in eastern kansas, now heading into southern missouri. the weekend forecast, it's going to be hot in texas and still cool up in the great lakes. forecast for dallas today, 104. one of the hottest days of the summer there. why you're looking very cool in the great lakes this weekend. look at chicago, only 78 on saturday, sunday remains cool too. and showers and storms in the mid-atlantic on saturday, hit and miss. a nice sunday throughout much of the country. should be an enjoyable weekend there. nice shot barnicle. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. sara likes fast-food lunch but also wants to save. a lunch like this from walmart is less than $1.50. whoa! if you switch out fast-food lunch just twice a week you can save over $470.00 bucks a year. $470 bucks. that's a ton of money. yeah. save on hot pockets sandwiches backed
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s there there's no pretty way to put this. i grew up in the suburbs. people think of the suburbs with
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the disadvantages of the city and none of the advantages of the country and vice versa. in a way, words of wonder years for us there in the suburbs was kind of a golden age for kids. >> the wonder years, a show that captured the picturesque suburban life of the late 1960s. now more than 40 years later, what's the reality of suburbia? here with us now, "fortune" magazine's assistant managing editor leigh gal her author of "the end of the suburbs" where the american dream is moving. i love it. >> as you know, mika, mike, harold, i hate making anything about me. >> right. >> i just do. >> it's sort of a thing. >> "the wonder years" i was born in the suburbs of atlanta in 1963. my dad worked for lockheed and it was -- that's how so many of us grew up. you say that even before the
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housing boom, there was strong cultural changes that were basically pushing that life away. >> yeah. absolutely right. it's no more. the sort of sepia tone memories that a lot of us have, grew up in the suburbs in the '70s or earlier, kind of a different time and a little more like "the wonder years." that time is gone for a number of reasons. >> the suburbs were created by white flight? >> they were created by a lot of government policies after world war ii when we had a huge housing shortage and nowhere to put everybody and the wonder of mass production was new and we thought that was the solution. we thought this was -- >> ike's -- >> the highways, a whole historical. i have a chapter on the history of the suburbs and how they came to be. when they came to be they were a different type of suburb. we've blown that model apart for these sort of super sized, remote kind of stepford subdivisions that a lot of people live in. i grew up in an old house in the
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suburbs and thought that was old and charming and conventional the way most people grew up. most people grew up in the more, especially younger people now, the kind of weed style subdivisions we see. i found a number of really interesting stats while doing this research but one of them is that the average age of housing stock in this country is 1974. >> yeah. >> that's pretty new. >> it is. >> but there's a lot of reasons why that's not good. i spent time talking about the design and why it's unhealthy and why it just sort of doesn't really bring us together, it sort of separates us more. so there's really i think the biggest, most important thing i found, there is this monumental shift that's happening that i just found fascinating. >> mike, that was, though, for the late '60s and '70s sort of the central organizing societal construct. that's where americans lived. >> after world war ii how most americans lived. they took the brand new highways
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as you point out in the book, eisenhower, they moved out to the suburbs. growing up in the atlanta suburbs in the '60s i would submit if you fly into atlanta today, the suburbs of atlanta and houston and washington, d.c., are so different than the suburbs you grew up in. you look out the window and sees this sprawl of cookie cutters subdivisions. >> it's unbelievable. in atlanta we lived in doraville and my grandma made fun of my mom, if you live in atlanta live in atlanta. it's not atlanta. doraville was swallowed up 30 years ago. my brother moved to alpharetta. you moved to the country. all the way up to buford. these things have been -- in houston, atlanta, other cities, they keep sprawling. >> sort of cut and pasted further out which has led to a number of problems for people's commutes which takes a huge toll on family life, not only health, but, you know, people think their prioritizing i'm going to get a nice yard for my family
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but if mom or dad is spending three hours to get there you're deprioritizing the family. there's a number of reasons why this is, you know, not the life that people imagined. i think many ways the suburbs, modern suburbs overshot their mandate and failed to deliver on what people thought they were getting and there's a demographic story too. i write about how my father grew up in a suburb outside of philadelphia called drexel hill and on his block there were 41 children at that time. it was an irish catholic community and there were kids everywhere and i hired a private investigator because there's been a lot of demographic changes, we're not having kids anymore nearly as much and now fewer than 15 children on the same block. that's a dramatic -- i mean the suburbs are sort of graying at the same time. a lot of suburbs where there are more senior citizens and baby boomers than young family with children. >> sort of like a boom mcmansions where i grew up, the big house and four of them came up directly next to us.
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i never saw a child. never saw a kid. i never saw any kids playing on that street. >> that's sort of -- and the mcmansion boom went on steroids during the housing boom. >> unbelievable. >> it provides a more solitary life than you think. the suburbs have tight knit communities but increasingly, the way we expanded they don't anymore. i talk to a woman in the story who left her 6,000 square foot mcmansion outside of chicago. >> 6,000 square feet. >> three-story foyer, circular driveway the whole deal, moved into this innovative community in libertyville illinois, sort of houses next to each other, you talk about seaside, i write about seaside in the book, seaside a community in florida one of the first sort of new urbanist communities. >> remarkable. >> really is gaining traction right now, but all the builders now and all of the developers are trying to build things in a way that -- >> are cohesive. >> in the suburbs as well. >> the thing is, when i -- you
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know, mike, when i campaigned, you hear all these political stories, john kennedy organized ward and precinct and whatever, i realized quickly you don't organize by neighborhoods because there's just -- there's no neighborhoods. >> no neighborhoods. >> the houses are there but there is no community. so i organized, you know -- >> churches, organized all these other places because you could not organize in these neighborhoods. >> politically today, off the book, off the suburbs, you see candidates they no longer go door to door in suburbs. you can't do that. when they get signatures to get on the ballot they're at shopping centers. >> i spoke with one -- >> walmart, shopping centers gun shows -- >> speaking of children, sam stein. >> yeah. >> speaking of -- >> come on now, we are going to play this straight today. >> did you grow up in a suburbs? >> i did. i grew up in a suburb outside of new haven, connecticut and it wasn't in one of the cookie cutter suburbs either. been there a while.
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mostly blood from the yale community that grew out from there. >> speaking of weeds, i mean -- >> yeah. >> go ahead. >> but my question really is, hinted at it a moment ago, put aside detroit in this conversation, but how often are we seeing people who when their kids grow up, leave home, are done with college, they start to rethink going back to the cities? >> a lot actually. the city story, detroit being kind of an exception, is cities are sort of wildly resurgent as a lot of us have read about. look at what happened in new york city and d.c. is a better example. but a lot of empty nesters are coming back. a lot of young families, people who would previously have completely decamped to the suburbs, more of those people with young children stay in the cities and, in fact, i have a couple people in the book who actually did beat the path to the suburbs with their young kids and pulled everybody up and uprooted and took them out of schools and moved back to the city. that's just one or two families,
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sure, but the data does support this. this is happening. there were these counterintuitive indicators and one i was surprised about was what the home builder toll brothers is doing which is building -- they have 30 buildings here in the new york city market, high-end luxury condo builders. the company that rose to fame on the suburban mega home. they're doing it. it's just -- all these indicators are pointing in the same direction and it's just new and it's -- something i think people don't really realize is happening. >> the book is "the end of the suburbs where the american dream is moving." leigh, stay with us if you can. coming up, thank you very much. congratulations. >> thank you. >> her book came out yesterday. politics are clearly complicated but what are the practical implications of obama care? dr. cosgrove of the cleveland clinic joins the conversation. up next, the numbers are in. and we now know if that controversial issue of "rolling stone" magazine with dzhokhar
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sar nay yev flew off the shelves or if they kept the magazine from selling. keep it here on "morning joe." i'm tony siragusa and i'm training guys who leak a little, to guard their manhood with new depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com
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35 past the hour. after a series of internal
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reviews the fbi concluded it could not have prevented the boston marathon bombings. the fbi was tipped off by a russian intelligence in 2011 about older brother tamerlan but ultimately decided he was not a threat. officials now say there was no evidence that he had been radicalized and they could not use surveillance tools like wire tapping to further investigate because of federal law. meanwhile, members of congress are frustrated with the fbi over a lack of transparency and the perceived intelligence shortcomings that may have allowed tsarnaev and his brothers to slip through their fingers. the controversial "rolling stone" with dzhokhar on the cover sold twice as many copies as most other issues. 13,000 copies were sold on newsstands even though a number of retailers yanked it from their shelves. are you surprised? >> no. i wasn't. mine the urge to boycott the
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magazine brought tremendous notoriety to the magazine and drove a lot of people to buy the magazine. >> it got people talking. >> yeah. >> even when those people were angry, i mean, i saw more copies of "rolling stone" lying around the office than i've seen in a long time. >> you know, the point of it was actually very interesting. >> the piece written on him was very interesting. >> it was. >> and it's something we have to address, how do young people who come from places like the tsarnaevs came from, how do they become so radicalized in a country that affords them such opportunity. >> it had such values. i'm not sure if that's a bad thing if people read it. president obama is reportedly down to three choices to replace ben bernanke at the federal reserve. a report in today's new york times says in addition to larry summers and janet yellen, former fed vice chair donald kohn is in the mix. summers isn't the only former obama official to be considered.
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treasury secretary timothy geithner was asked by the white house if he wanted the job but geithner declined. i think he's tired. paul krugman says janet yellen is the most qualified person to take over but believes some are trying to use her gender to keep her from getting the job. his piece writes in, quote, in part this, the campaign against miss yellen involves repeated suggestions almost always off the record that she lacks the gravitas to lead the fed. what does that mean? well, suppose we're talking about a man with miss yell len's credentials, distinguished, academic work, leader of the council of economic advisors, six years as president of the san francisco fed, a record of working effectively with colleagues at the board of governors. would anyone suggest a man with those credentials was somehow unqualified for office? sorry, but it's hard to escape the conclusion that gravitas in this context mainly means
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possessing a y chromosome. "the wall street journajournal" surve journal" surveyed the top records at the fed, janet yellen was the most accurate. there where you go on a number of levels. >> nothing but gravitas actually. i mean -- >> yeah. >> that's sort of what she brings to the table. the notion she doesn't have it is ludicrous. >> the comments are without base because they can't think of anything else, obviously, and so then you have to look at whether her gender plays a role. is that fair sh. >> absolutely fair. >> up next, a checkup on the president's health care law with dr. tobey cosgrove. president and ceo of the cleveland clinic. back with much more "morning joe." welcome. how are you doing? thanks to the grit and resilience and determination of the american people,
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we've been able to clear away the rubble from the financial crisis. we started to lay a new foundation for stronger, more durable economic growth. but we're not there yet. what we need is not a 3-month plan or even a 3-year plan. we need a long-term american strategy: job security with good wages and durable industries.
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at the cleveland clinic, one of the best health care systems in the world, they actually provide great care, cheaper than average, and the reason they do is because they do some smart things. they say if a patient is coming in, let's get all the doctors together at once, do one test instead of having the patient run around with it ten tests. >> free people and free enterprises trying to find ways to do things better are able to be more effective in bringing down the costs than the government will be. your example of the cleveland clinic is my case in point. along with several others i could describe. this is the private market. these are enterprises competing with each other, learning how to do better and better jobs. >> that was president obama and mitt romney reaching a consensus
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on at least one topic during the 2012 presidential debate. the cleveland clinic. here with us now, the ceo and president of the cleveland clinic, dr. toby cosgrove, who i just realized is a fellow e. >> he went to college. >> top school and, of course, on to the top hospital in the country. let's talk about the cleveland clinic model. because it was interesting to see that exchange and what is it that's different about the way other systems work that keeps costs down and quality high? >> well, we're a group practice and salaried. there's no financial incentive for us to do more or less. we've kept costs down that way. at the same time very transparent about quality. publishing it on -- pubts it on the internet and we think it's important that people know exactly how we do it. >> yeah. and then you look at how this -- i know you have great stories. you want to go? i just want to know how this wraps around the debate around the affordable care act and
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where you stand on that? >> the affordable care act, we really were dealing with a 1950 health care system in the united states. we have to change. the costs are eating up all the other things. >> is it okay to say there was a moral need for it? >> if we don't control the costs which are going up rapidly we're going to lose things like education and all the other social activities that we need to do. so we've got to do this and that's why i think it's called the affordable care act. that's where the emphasis is. one of the things that we've done is put together an integrated health care delivery system that tries to drive to efficiency. >> you have at the cleveland clinic something almost unheard of today in medicine, same day appointments. >> right. >> two questions. one, how do you carry out same day appointments for people and two, off of mika's question, what is the biggest negative impact thus far, if any, of the affordable care act on the cleveland clinic? >> yeah. >> well, let me deal with the second one first.
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we're concerned and i think everybody in health care is, that we're having a huge change and know we're going to get paid less for what we do and we have to decrease costs all the way across and the question is how are we going to do that and can we do that without affecting quality? second part of your question is, we realize when people call up to make an appointment, we don't know if they've got to be seen right now or when they need to be seen. we ask them, do you need to be seen today? if they say yes, we make an appointment for them that day. last year we saw 1 million same day appointments. of the people who said they would like to have it, 98% got it. >> sam stein is in washington, he has a question for you. >> yeah. it strikes me the sort of two philosophical prongs of modern health care system are to do preventative services, preventative care, and to change from a fee for service to fee for care. i'm wondering what lessons you've learned at the cleveland clinic to be applied nationally with respect to those two health care functions. >> that's a good question.
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the important thing is we recognize it's got to be health care, not sickness care, which we've always done in the past, so what we've done is started with our employees and ban smoking on our campus, don't hire smokers, and we give free smoking cessation to the entire community. we've seen the incidence of smoking in cleveland go from 28% to 15% over a five-year period of time. the other thing we've said look, our employees need to have good food and we've changed the food throughout the entire organization. and we've also said they have to have exercise, we give them free curves, free weight watchers, free access to the gyms, free yoga and lost 420,000 pounds in the last two years. >> oh, my gosh. >> that's amazing. this reminds me of at fortu"for we rank the best companies to work for, many have principles like this, google has done a lot with nutrition in particular, but the smoking is revolutionary and forward looking. do you think other companies are
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going to kind of follow and literally not hire smokers? that's pretty -- did you come under fire for that? >> i came under fire for that. but i think it was the right thing to do because health care ought to model what appropriate health is. 6,000 companies across the united states don't hire smokers and we're seeing increasing activity about other hospitals not doing it, university of pennsylvania just stopped hiring smokers. you see now ohio state is banning smoking on their campuses. i'm trying to get our alma mater to ban smoking on its campus. >> let's do that. let's call adam together and try to, you know, push it. >> the president of the college should ban smoking. they don't need it. we'll go together. shall we? >> perfect. >> all this weight that was lost, i don't want that to get lost in all of this other sort of discussion that we're having. that's a big story. >> it's a huge story. i have talked to people regul regularly who lose 100 pounds. i talked to a lady the other day who lost 200 pounds and, you
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know, sometimes, you know, ceos don't get much appreciation, every now and then you get a hug from somebody saying thank you for helping me. it's terrific. >> they probably didn't -- if you bring it into their entire lifestyle and that's you, that's the employers, where we are all day. >> that's where we are and if that can be a part of this, you know, can help us with our obesity problem, that's where we live. >> and i think quite frankly we're not going to see the push on wellness coming from the government. we need to do it in the private employers and i think it was a big opportunity there to change the health of the united states. >> you know, as an offshoot of the same day appointments, emergency rooms medicine, how does that impack the bottom line of the cleveland clinic? >> where a lot of people i would assume in cleveland given the poverty level in cleveland the emergency room is their family doctor? >> we see increased visits regardless of that. in washington they talk about access being insurance.
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we talk about access actually getting to see a care provider. so in the emergency room we've taken our waiting time from door to doctor to under 13 minutes on average by changing the way we do it. >> across nine hospitals as an average. also if your kid gets sick in the middle of the night, got a temperature of 103, we have a nurse on call and we get 200,000 calls and, say, i got a kid that's sick, can you help me, and they have a whole protocol they go through. >> before you go, do we challenge williams college, pogsably the best small school in the country? >> i think so. >> to ban smoking? >> i think we ought to challenge all schools to ban smoking on their campuses because that's a lot of times where people learn to smoke. >> and best school could be the leader in that. i'll be in touch. we'll continue the conversation online, asking dr. cosgrove about transparency.
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use #mojo for your discussions. doctor, thank you, so nice to meet you. >> nice to see you. >> former nsa director michael hayden weighs in on the slow leak of classified information. how the intelligence disclosures of snowden have impacted the fight against terrorism. first, a remarkable find in turkey. why archaeologists believe they may have found a biblical treasure linked to jesus. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel.
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there is new speculation this morning a church in turkey may have housed a remarkable relic. nbc's martin fletcher reports on a one of a kind discovery. >> reporter: after digging for four years and finding 1,000 human skeletons, turk irk archaeologists believe they may have struck biblical gold, a fragment of the cross of jesus. the professor says this piece may contain a bone of a christian saint or the piece of
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a cross that jesus was krauss f crui cruisefewed on. in the 4th century are wood fragments said to be from the cross were sent from these shores to rome in today aeshgs turkey. could this discovery be one of those? the biblical link raises the profile of any find. the shroud of turin is said to hold the image of jesus. in lake galilee, an ancient fishing boat found in the mud was said to have possibly belonged to jesus. the archaeologists say the stone and its contents are very important history. they're being examined in a laboratory. >> this was nbc's martin fletcher. up next, wall street and the white house are waiting for this morning's job reports. we'll have full analysis. [ male announcer ] this is bob,
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e-trade. less for us. more for you. good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up. >> yes, if you want to. >> take a live look at new york city. on set we have mike barnicle, thomas roberts, with his seven-second delay. >> in place. >> harold ford jr. and in washington, young sam stein. >> whippersnapper.
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>> the white house is stepping in once again when it comes to the way obama care is being implemented. first, it was the decision to delay the employer mandate. now the president has personally intervened to allow the government to continue helping members of congress and their staff when it comes to paying their premiums. members of congress were furious that they would soon be forced to pay thousands of dollars -- >> members of congress, harold, were furious they were going to be held to the same law that they passed, right? >> odd. >> it is odd. they got so angry -- by the way, so the president goes up to see the democrats this week, what is the first thing, mike, they're yelling at him about? >> what about my premiums? >> exactly, you mean we're going to have to live by the laws that we passed on to the american people? >> oh, we're going to have to worry about the same things our constituents worry about? >> they take their vacations
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when -- >> five weeks. >> usually when things are just, like, happening, they leave. they would be forced to pay thousands of dollars in additional costs through obama care's insurance marketplaces. some warn that lawmakers would leave washington and their staffers would look for work outside of government service. >> really? >> the horror. >> hold on a second. so hold on. so harold, when small business owners are telling the obama administration, you know, if you do this, we're going to lose some of our best employees and the administration says no, no, you all are so crazy, what are you talking about, it's happening on capitol hill. they said, we're going to lose our best staffers if obama care's implemented up there. >> you would have thought they would come up with a different -- >> the three scariest words on capitol hill among the staff and among the elected officials are "the private sector."
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forced to go look in the private sector? whoo. >> now the administration is set to announce a plan that lets the federal government continue paying its share congressional health plans. in turn, those employees would be ineligible for any tax credits or subsidies. >> it's crazy, you know, one of the first things we passed when we got up there, you remember chris shays, great guy, great congressman, from connecticut, we passed what was called the shays act. it was radical. first day we were up there. and it made congress live by the same rules that the rest of the country live by. >> that's terrible. >> that didn't last long. so now, seriously, how embarrassing, that they passed this law. again, small business owners have been complaining about it. >> this is one of those things that, you know, you and i understand you're going to hear come next summer, next fall, as the campaigns get going. >> this is the 30 second ad. >> it's one of those things that's easy to explain and it's
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hard to dispute. there may be some caveats. but this is an easy one. >> the 30-second ad, you would not like and i would not like. congressman scarborough voted for obama care to raise your health premiums and yet he had the president exempt him from obama care. let's exempt congressman scarborough from congress. like that. this is set up so easily for these democrats who -- these democrats who passed this. >> cue scary music. >> please play scary music and let joe do that again. >> it's awful, so embarrassing. >> -- about just such a spot being put together for this weekend. >> look at you, prophetic. all right, moving on. this weekend, we're going to get our first real look at how the u.s. senate race in kentucky is
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shaping up. >> there you go. >> both senator mitch mcconnell and his democratic opponent anderson grimes will speak at a picnic. more than 10,000 people are expected to attend. which unofficially kicks off the state's political season. if the public polling is to be believed, the race is already in a dead heat. according to a new ppp poll, lund lundergran grimes has a lead over mcconnell. found the democrat with a two-point lead. since announcing her candidacy, lundergran grimes has come out swinging, which may be a reason why the race is already so close. she's warned mcconnell she's not going to be bullied. she's already aggressively campaigning in kentucky's coal country and is making a hard push to win over female voters by questioning mcconnell's record on women's rights.
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lundergran grimes is distancing herself from president obama who lost 116 out of kentucky's 120 counties -- >> is that bad? >> it's not good. she would be the first female senator elected to the u.s. senate from kentucky. >> sam stein, if someone your age, they're like basically, what, 16, 17 years old, would not remember when kentucky was actually a swing state, and it is a swing state at heart. a lot of people are looking at this going, well, barack obama lost badly there. don't remember that bill clinton won there and that kentucky elects democrats often. this is going to be a tough race for mitch mcconnell. >> i agree with that. although mitch mcconnell has built this type of political infracture in the state by quietly bringing back money. by being there for the basic institutions of the state. the university, the sports team, et cetera. he hases this reservoir of good will. but you're right, people presume kentucky is just deep red
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because obama got trounced there. i doubt obama will be campaigning on her behalf but it's not, you know, it's not impossible for a democrat to win statewide. it happened with bill clinton. there are pocket, of democratic support. elliott county in kentucky is the longest continuously voting democratic county in america. there is a possibility there. i think these polls show there's room for her to improve because she's not necessarily a recognized figure in the state. mitch mcconnell has a tough race on his hands. >> i know mcconnell's peep know it's going to be tough. >> the picnic this weekend is kind of -- it's a tradition, you know, thousands of people show up. there have been some kentucky throwdowns in the past between politicians. >> really? >> so in this instance, i think what people are speculating is you just go in and try and do no harm. just show up and have a good time and not get too political. but the governor, it's a
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democratic governor. the state is capable of electing a democrat. but if she paints mitch mcconnell as the d.c. insider that he is, uneffective, third most powerful man in washington, d.c., she might have an easy time if she's already leading in the polls this way. if you got ashley judd coming out for her -- >> oh, my god. of course ashley -- tennessee mansion, i mean, that would be awesome. tennesseans for kentuckiens for anybody but mitch. all right, what else we have? >> okay, snowden. >> what about that, huh, that vladimir? >> big story. we have michael hayden on today so great timing to ask him about this. it's been a while since we've seen edward snowden. now we've got a new picture of him. it's stamped inside official government papers making him a legal resident of russia. >> thank god, he got his freedom. >> it's hard to believe -- >> by the way, wasn't there a
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movie, like, gregory hines, whoever, or -- >> did what? >> separate lives, where the guy was a protester in the '60s and he wanted to go to russia for freedom -- >> wasn't he a dancer? >> yes. a great dancer. >> what was it? >> separate lives. >> was barichnikov in the movie? >> yes. >> laura branigan? >> i don't think so. >> bettaryshnikov was in the mo. >> what are you guys talking about? >> sam, you weren't even born. >> this is the oldest-sounding conversation on "morning joe" ever, oh, my god. >> do you know who baryshnikov is?
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>> "what is that movie, ehh." >> carey bradshaw in the second. carrie left big and went back to big. >> she should have stayed with baryshnikov. >> sam, if you'll be quiet, young whippersnapper, i'm going to have some metamucil with my soft oatmeal. >> the former nsa contractor has been granted -- >> what? >> you need, like, a lazy boy, just to sit there -- >> if phil griffin will do his job i'll be in the lazy boy by the end of next week. >> all right. edward snowden. stay with me here. the former nsa contractor has been granted temporary asylum by moscow that will allow him to remain in the country for at least a year. yesterday, snowden was seen leaving the moscow airport where he was stranded for more than a month. it goes without saying that russia's decision complicates
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relations with the u.s. all right. nbc's jim maceda is in moscow who will raise the bar on this conversation here. >> ask him if he saw "white nights," if he thought baryshnikov did a better job there than "sex and the city." >> i can't remember what i was going to say -- you guys make me laugh. we need something uplifting here and you bring it, you really bring it. >> terrific. >> listen, mika, there's no question that snowden's release has further strained very difficult relationships to begin with. we heard jay carney yesterday say that the united states was extremely disappointed that they are re-evaluating the utility, i think was the word, in diplomat-speak, the upcoming summit between the two individuals. mao far he's willing to hit back
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and embarrass putin. boycotting a major event like the g-20 coming up in st. petersburg at the beginning of september, that, according to analysts here, seems unlikely. that's probably a step too far. again, that planned summit where they're supposed to talk about a whole range of issues, syria, iran, nukes, even a new nuclear arms treaty between the two countries, one on one, that seems likely now to be cancelled out of protest. the american fugitive, not baryshnikov, but snowden, spends his first night in freedom as an official refugee here in russia. his lawyer said he's staying in the home of an american ex-pat family. presumably somewhere in moscow, though we're not sure, and he looks forward, according to the lawyer, to learning russian, to getting a job, and supporting himself. by the way, you'll enjoy this, he's not interested in any kind of i.t. job. he apparently wants to work as a
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human rights activist. back to you guys. >> nbc's jim mess sed aceda, th >> thank you, jim. we're going to send you a dvd of the movie. "white nights." 1985, mike. he's taken to an apartment in which a black american who has married a russian woman, lives with her. he's to become a dancer again but wishes to escape but can he trust the american. >> the american was gregory hines i assume? >> extraordinary dancer, pretty great answer. >> "say you, say me," song by lionel richie, that song. i remember we got a free weekend of hbo. i guess the neighbors got it but they gave it to us. i spent time using vhs to tape movies. >> a bigger issue with this story here in terms of our relationship with russia and --
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>> that song "separate lives" was in it. >> coming up, cnbc's kelly evans will break down the numbers for us. and what really goes on inside the nsa. michael hayden -- >> he's here? i hope he's still here. i've got a lot of questions i want to ask him. >> uh, all right. >> i got a lot of e-mail accounts i am trying to delete and when i delete them do i delete them forever? or is there a big screen they flash across? >> the pope makes groundbreaking comments on tolerance of gays. we have father james martin with us. first, bill with the forecast. >> maybe the father can straighten us all out on this friday morning. we need it after that. let's talk about trouble spots on this friday morning, then give you the weekend forecast. summer weekends are just rolling
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by way too fast. the worst of the weather is through eastern portions of kansas. we're about to see heavy rain moving towards springfield and joplin. boston, it looks like we're about to give you the all clear. just a few showers left heading out on the cape. chicago, some thunderstorms right overhead. midway airport, maybe some delays. as far as the airports go, kansas city and st. louis, you have the best shot of seeing any significant delays. minor delays possible through many airports in the ohio valley including cleveland and pittsburgh. we're cool in the great lakes. we're hot in texas. i'm talking really hot in the big d. dallas, 104. as we go through the weekend, nothing too dramatic. and then by sunday, we're looking at a dry day in much of the east. just a few showers and storms in the soggy southeast. we've had anything but a warm summer. washington, d.c., the sun is out. we're looking for a really nice start to your weekend. you're watching "morning joe"
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russia has stabbed us in the back and each day that snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife. mr. putin seems to relish poking us in the eye. as long as prime minister putin acts like a bully, we have only one choice, to stand up to him
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and show him bullies pay a price. >> all right. 19 past the hour. joining us now, former director of the nsa -- >> this is not a fair fight. these are cheap dirty tactics. >> this is what they do. retired general michael hayden. he's now a principal at a global security firm. >> we were going to attack you -- >> yes, we were. >> we were going to say horrible things about you. going all glenn greenwald on you. and you bring your grandchildren and we have to be nice. >> they're adorable. >> thank you. >> we have to be extra nice. first all, you've got to be deeply disappointed that putin is allowing snowden to stay. put this into perspective for us. why don't we -- put it in, like, cold war terms. it's just -- >> well, i mean, there's an
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awful lot of this that has the echo of 20 and 30 years ago, doesn't it? and now you've got an american president, actually a is supplicant, to get this young man back. remember the cambridge five? quite a few of them ended up there. they ended up unhappily. they drank themselves to death. i don't wish that on young mr. snowden. but you do see echoes of that period in what's going on now. despite the so-called reset. >> putin's from that era. is the resentment -- it seems to me whether you're talking about putin or the foreign policy, seems like russia's foreign policy on us is built on resentment. >> putin and his team are in charge of a declining power. this isn't china or some other ascendant economy or military force. this is about managing russian decline. but you've got a leader there,
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now, with an expansive ego. actually russia's power right now is confined to the ability to say no. it's confined to the ability to obstruct. >> no on syria, no on iran. >> they seem to be mocking us. >> so snowden's father has been out talking. and he's suggesting that his son can't get a fair trial in the united states. and actually he's more of a whistleblower than anything. what would you say to that? >> i would reject the whistleblower characterization. by him -- by his father. and frankly, unfortunately, by a significant fraction of our own population. i mean, a whistleblower is a technical term. it's raising your hand and telling people in authority that this isn't right, i disagree with this and given them a chance to respond or correct it. he didn't do any of that. there's no record of his complaining within the system. >> okay, but what he did do i think is maybe reveal something important that we need to look
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at in terms of maybe a process we go through as we try and protect our country. i want to read from "the new york times" editorial. it was actually yesterday but it's an important piece. it's entitled more fog from the spy agencies. covering of course what's happening on capitol hill. the agency has previously claimed that 54 plot ys disrupted by the collection of phone records and a separate targeted collection of internet data. but those claims seem to fade away on wednesday. in his testimony, the best that the deputy nsa director could come up with was there is an example that come close to a "but for" example. senators who have been arguing for the termination of bulk collection of telephone data were joined by leahy and grassley, republican of iowa, in criticizing the director of the national intelligence james clapper for falsely telling congress the agency was not collecting large volumes of data on american's phone calls. are they preventing possible attacks or not? >> it's a tool. i would not want to give up if i
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were still in government. >> i know, but are they preventing attacks? have they? >> the numbers are this, about 60 attacks have been prevented here and abroad in a combination of the two programs. the government's been quite clear. the more dominant program, the one that's been more successful, is the one called prism that has to do with content and e-mails. so you've got a dozen or so that have been aided by the meta data program. my reading of the public statements of our government is you've got one "but for" this is the one that did it. you've got one -- that had to do with the somali man wiring funds to al shabab in somalia. one more that's really helpful here in new york collecting n a nazabil azazi to -- >> you would prefer to have it as a cross reference to more dominant programs? >> the other programs have been
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more successful but, joe, this is a quad rent you would like to have covered. this is one where you want the ability under the right kind of circumstances to link telephone calls to known terrorists. >> if you had more dominant programs, mike, it's helpful to have a list of numbers to cross-check, to see in patterns develop. you never know what's going to be effective. >> we're now at a stage i think culturally where people think their phone calls are being listened to all day long by the government, that's not the case. but you indicate you don't feel snoweden is a whistleblower. what is he and could you give us your assessment on the extent of the damage you perhaps think he has done with the release. >> yeah, he's a young man in whom we trusted a great deal of information and he's betrayed that trust. i mean, that's not just ethically wrong, that's a series of felonies. he may claim he's done it for a
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higher purpose, all right, i'll grant that within his own conscious he may believe that. i also feel he does not quite understand your second point, how much damage he has done. look, we had the bradley manning verdict this past week. manning was bad. but i would suggest to you manning was discrete. bits of information. that report, that state department cable, so on. kind of cups of water or buckets of water. snowden's revealing the plumbing. snowden is telling the world how we get information. and so the effects of this aren't going to be short-term and transient. they're going to be long-term and permanent. >> didn't the world already know that? >> not really. >> do you think he underestimated, do you think he was sort of naive going into this about what would happen to him? i mean, was there a certain my evty here? >> combustible combination of naivete and narcissism. >> hasn't he revealed a real
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hole in the system, if we see it from your point of view? >> sure, it does. in a perfect world, we'd have detected that and closed off his clearances. but keep in mind, i mean what we've been doing since 9/11, what you have demanded that we do since 9/11, is connect the dots. i mean, there's a phraseology, it takes a network to defeat a network, right? we're going after the network of al qaeda. what comprises a network? nodes. empowered nodes. nodes that have some self-actualization, some autonomy. that comes about from the sharing of information. look, sharing's good. but like all virtues, it has a dark side. let me connect the dots between manning and snowden. these are two young men, i think both troubled, all right, who did very bad things but are representative of at least a fraction of the generation from which we are now recruiting. a generation that has a different balance point between
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transparency and secrecy than our generations have had. we need to recruit these kids. they're america. they're talented. but they also need to be shown that whatever it is they think the balance point is over here for their facebook page, that's not the balance point the government will insist they observe inside our secrets. >> sam stein is in washington, "washington post." sam? >> thanks for doing this. put aside whether snowden and manning were troubled -- i don't know how we can assess their psychological state. my question for you is about the intelligence communities actions throughout the entirety of this. isn't part of the problem that there's been so much secrecy about these operation? and secondly, when director clapper went on the hill, what he admitted was, essentially lied to congress about, doesn't that do damage to the intelligence community as well? >> well, yeah. jim's testimony -- jim, look, i both sympathize and empathize with jim clapper. he was put in a no win situation
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by that question. jim knows he could have handled that far more artfully. the answer he gave is not the answer he would have wanted to have given. so i think that's true. now, with regard to secrecy, all right, this was only secret to the public. it wasn't secret to three branches of government. congress knew. the oversight committees knew. both houses of congress, both political parties and the american court system knew. you go back to the federal court papers and james madison and so on and talk about the separations of powers. this is as good as it gets in our system. >> by the way, this is the same thing that happened with the program that was put in place where we would interrogate terrorists. and they were all briefed. everybody knew about it. everybody knew about water boarding. everybody in that room was told about water boarding. a lot of liberals that came out and were shocked and stunned and deeply saddened later on at the time were saying -- that's what
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we're going to do? they were there. then it hits "the washington post." then the program's destroyed. we have no effective way to integrate these terrorists in the future. the same thing's happened here, hasn't it? >> no, look, and the antecedent for everybody in the program is a relatively small number. the antecedent for everybody in this program is a really big number. some of the documents clapper put on wednesday show in '09 and 2011 every member of congress was invited to read about bulk meta data collection and only a few took advantage of the opportunity. >> right. >> that's reassuring too. michael hayden -- >> you do wonder why congress' approval ratings -- >> how many can read? >> they wanted to bring their staff in. >> you have big plans for the grandkid? >> the intrepid, the museum and the theater. >> you have your hands full.
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look at them. oh, boy. i'm nervous. up next, july jobs report is about to cross. we'll have a complete breakdown of the numbers on the other side of the break. keep it right here on "morning joe." it's back to school time and we're talking with diane about the walmart low price guarantee, backed by ad match. you got your list? let's go! look at that price! i like that! they need those for school. wow! that's the walmart low price guarantee backed by ad match. save time and money getting your kids ready for school bring in ads from your local stores and see for yourself. i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com "first day of my life" by bright eyes
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hey, kelly, let's get right to the breaking news on the jobs report. >> a little something here for everybody. a little bit soft i would say with regard to what happened with job gains last month. here's what we just learned. the u.s. economy added 162,000 jobs in july. it's about 20,000 light of what we expected. especially because a lot of the surveys this week had pointed towards something more along the 200,000 level which is also the prevailing level for the past six months or so. it would appear to be a step back in the pace of job creation. about 27,000 combined revised lower from june and may. so if you take it altogether, we're actually shy here versus what was expected by about 50,000. what's interesting at the same time though, this is not an unfamiliar pattern in this recovery, the unemployment rate fell. >> of course. >> down to 7.4%. >> we come in below expectations. we really need to hit 200,000 to maintain the level of
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employment. and of course with this bad news, the unemployment rate drops. which of course people will be debating why it drops. i guess participation lower. >> sure. exactly. i was going to say, before i let you debate this one, the civilian labor force down by 37,000. the participation rate ticking down to 63.4 from 63.5. you'd rather see the unemployment rate steady or moving higher. the number of discouraged workers is up to almost 1 million. >> and that is -- i mean, that's about as high as it's been over the past generation. >> yeah, that's true. the participation rate is really the thing to look for. i mean, the labor force is being eroded gradually, you know, so kelly said 63, down from 64, something like that. almost parallels the home ownership rate which has been falling at a kind of similar rate. it's actually about the same. but, you know, at a certain point obviously the rate ticking down will be a good thing so i'm just wondering, you know, when do we get to that point. right now the rate ticking down
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still means people are falling off. the jobs number overall, it's been study like that for the past couple months. people wonder why is the gdp number so disappointing when the jobs number has been relatively steady till today -- >> boy, we have so many mixed messages, kelly. so i guess since this is bad news -- >> i was just looking at the market reaction. interesting one to watch. >> it's bad news. the markets will probably go up, right? >> when you talk to people, and i hate when they use this phrase, but they'll say sweet spot a lot, where the numbers are good but not good enough for the fed to jump out of the scene right away. we might be back into this old case where i'm looking, i'm not seeing a ton of movement yet. we might see the 10-year bench mark rate. this morning before the report, the markets were looking strong. this whole week, we had seen better data. now i think we get a bit a pause. we'll hear from the voting member, he may have a few more
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comments to add here. >> cnbc's kelly evans, thank you so much. up next, pope francis spoke to millions in brazil but his comments to just a handful of reporters made headlines worldwide. what his remarks mean for future of the church. faith on fridays next with father james martin. >> and cardinal mike barnicle. [ female announcer ] when you're ready to take skincare to the next level you're ready for roc® new roc® multi correxion
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but then not every suny is celebrated by pope francis. the pope seemed to love every minute of it. donning the head dress of brazil's people. kissing the children lifted to him. >> what a difference a decade makes. world youth day in 2002 and world youth day this summer. here with us now, jesuit priest father james martin. >> we said we didn't see this coming. you suggested the cardinals didn't see this coming. you said maybe only the holy spirit knew. i mean, this pope is shaking things up in remarkable ways. >> i think the cardinals wanted someone who was going to change things obviously. i don't think they knew he would be quite so revolutionary. he is really shaking things up. he said he wanted to do that. he said, i want to make a mess. >> well, he made one. he made one. while he was making a mess,
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there's personal touches. he even wrote you a note. a handwritten note. the humility the guy shows in all aspects of his ministry is amazing. >> he is. it's a very pastoral touch. people obviously respond to him. he's someone who had been a jesuit priest. so he has that common touch. i think that sort of humility and austerity are touching people. >> you already see from what's happened this week the possibility of him being transformational. like only a few popes that we've seen. italian "vanity fair" named francis man of the year. elton john told the magazine francis is a miracle of humility in an era of vanity. >> even without taking a position on gay clergy or any issues, he sent a message to the world. which is, you know, we're going to do something different, we're going to follow the teachings o
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judging to god. it was almost a direct quote out of sermon on the mount, matthew 7, judge not that you be not judged. >> all the popes are teaching christ but it's with a different emphasis. that message he had on the plane, number one, he used the word "gay" which is pretty unissue. certainly not for a pope. a pope's never done that. he talked about gay people as being able to find god. he talked about gay preets. rather than saying there can be no gay priests which was the document that came out in 2005, he said, who am i to judge? finally, just his tone. >> he said, who am i to judge if somebody's trying to live a christ-centered life? if they are working hard, who am i to judge? there have been suggestions that somehow he is endorsing gay clergy. no, not really. he's endorsing the words of jesus christ.
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basically saying we don't have god as a santa claus, right, but let god judge, not us. >> it's not up to judge. the gospels are concerned a great deal with judgment. they talk about a last judgment. in every event, jesus says, that's up to god. act morally yourselves but leave the judging of other people up to god. >> judge not that you shall be judged, on and on and on. >> mercy's the key word, joe. the roots of this papacy, how much of it is rooted in his jesuit background and how much of it has to do with his repeated use of that phrase, mercy? >> a lot of it is his spiritualspiri spirituality of his faith. you're absolutely right, mercy is a hallmark. he said in one of his first messages after he was elected something like the most
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important and powerful message of the gospel is mercy, period. we're seeing that a great deal. >> wow, leigh. >> do you think he has the potential to bring people back to the catholic church who have become disaffected? the best corporate leaders shake things up like that. they do things that are outlandish and disrupt. he's really kind of doing that in a way with his leadership style, you know, here. what do you think that means for the catholic church? >> jesus liked to make a mess, you know, he came to stir things up as well. we have to be careful not to kind of denigrate john paul or benedict who brought people back in their own way. he's bringing a different group of people back. people are telling me, i'm going back to the church because of francis. they see the possibility of change, of someone who speaks to them, in a way that john paul and benedict didn't speak to them. not because they were bad popes, just because they're different people. he's bringing a new group of people into the church. >> you talk about jesus shaking things up.
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i've just got to say this because through the week there have been people who have been pushing back on what the pope said. who am i to judge? they will go to leviticus or find something that paul said. instead of going to, you know, the red letters, the actual words the gospel. it was not just jesus' words, it was jesus' life. he hung out with tax collectors who were the most despised, the most hated. the woman at the well. all the religious leaders were about to stone. and jesus just sat there. they said, what should we do? he just sat there and stared. he said, i'll tell you, let he who is without sin cast the first stone. you could hear all the rocks falling. that's the message this pope delivered. leave the judging to god. you worry about yourself. >> you're absolutely right. all those great examples you gave. he's doing it not just with his words but his actions. jesus is going out to people
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like the woman at the well, you know, the woman caught in adultery. the pope is doing this as well in words and in deeds. he's also reaching ought to the poor. when he went to that falvela in rio. he's putting his body there the same way jesus was doing. i'm all for it. i'm a big fan of this guy. i think he's terrific. not just because he's a jesuit. >> like jesus, shaking up the religious leaders. >> we need to be shaken up all the time by jesus and all the time by religious leaders. >> father james martin, thank you so much. >> thank you, father. up next, the "morning joe" week in review. [ school bell rings ] ♪ school's out for summer ♪ [ male announcer ] from the last day of school, back to the first. they're gonna need a lot of stuff. for everything kids need to everything they want in styles and colors as unique as they are. staples has it. stock up for the year now
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let's go to our live russian dash cam now to see if we can spot edward snowden. ♪
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>> wow. >> okay. from anthony weiner to edward snowden, this week was completely -- forgettable? >> i don't know, but if you need proof, that it actually happened, here is our week in review. >> i think that's what joe's doing right now. >> this is a really long walk for him. he left this morning. >> i'm not a big fan. i need to go. >> yeah, it's august 1st. it's august, man. >> anthony weiner, he's mentally ill. >> i think if we want him to go away, then we just have to let him go. >> sounding like the person that drew up those posters in
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spencer's gifts in the '70s where a dove would be flying and it said, if you love them, let you go. >> one of my favorite expression, a pimple on the ass of progress. >> there's a task i can join you at? i'll be there. >> mika, you stay away from these protests. >> what? >> socialist. i don't want working class americans to have to pay more money for their big mac. it's a god given right. >> sugary drinks? >> it always was a bad idea. i'm concerned about child -- >> you had me at stop and frisk. donny deutsch's success. i give that about three seconds. ♪ hey hey hey >> right there. okay. >> ah. >> see, that's why they don't press charges. >> i love you. >> that's not good. >> i'll blush as much as
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rattner. >> there's nothing more sexy than when democrats fight. >> there is a real turn-on for joe watching two democrats fight. >> you cannot catch a veneeral disease from your iphone. >> yes. >> thank god. sam, you weren't even born. >> this is the oldest-sounding conversation ever. "what is that movie?" >> first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> boy, he didn't change america. he doesn't even change his underwear. >> ugh, doesn't wear it. >> how do you know? >> coming up next, what if anything did we learn, other than mika knows that bill karins doesn't wear underwear sometimes. the last four hours... have seen one child fail... to get to the air sickness bag in time. another left his shoes on the plane. his shoes. and a third just simply doesn't want to be here.
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♪ you have no right >> oh, my god with this music, stop. >> come on. >> so bad. >> is that not amazing? 1985. >> what did we learn, joe? >> i learned that sam stein is a mood killer when i'm trying to go back to the roaring '50s and i want to play blueberry hill and you're like, hey, grandpa. so, sam, what did you learn? >> i learned that when the talk turns to the papacy and the politic, of the catholic church, the producers on the show don't even bother coming to me.
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>> oh. wow, he's some -- a bit of a whiner. >> kind of needy, isn't he? i got to talk to your ma about that. >> speaking of music, i learned this is a great show to come on and talk about your book. cue the music. today when we were talking about this, he played "rocking the suburbs" by ben fold. it was awesome. >> unbelievable. cue is the best. >> i learned we have another photographer in the family. sophie, she's 12. look what happened in the cape cod chronicle. her picture of a bunny. and alex didn't want to show this. he wanted to ruin her day. >> because we're a minute and a half past and chuck todd is the most patient guy of all time. >> sophie, great job! >> sophie, great job. >> good picture! >> while we're at it, look at the picture. >> that's my cat emma. >> if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." stick around for the always patient chuck todd and "the daily rundown" where we learn more about politics in an hour than you'll len

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